Sevier County Amateur Radio Society Supports Our Scouts

JOTA

Event Details

JOTA

Sevier County Amateur Radio Society invites all scouts to attend our meetings, and get together as well as events we are involved in ,  you don't have to be a member of the club, if you have questions about amateur radio ,here is the place to come and ask question, be on the radio with us,  we will help you in getting your amateur radio license, as well as mentor after you get your  amateur radio ticket.

Amateur Radio opens a very large world in communications, via RF, Internet , Analog & Digital modes.

JOTA & Scouts & Parents & Scout Leaders

 JOTA is a spectacular opportunity to introduce Scouts to amateur radio. For many, this will be their first exposure to the world of ham radio. Some will go on to become hams, enjoying the hobby for a lifetime. A few will even find the basis of a career in science and technology. 

 

  • All radio operators must operate their station strictly in accordance with FCC regulations.
  • Stations should try to contact each other by calling “CQ Jamboree” or “CQ JOTA” or by answering other stations sending this call.

Some Frequencies That  Are Used:

 

2 Meter FM Simplex

147.450, 147.480, 147.510, 147.540* * Use 147.540 as Calling Channel. Always listen first to avoid interfering with another QSO or auxiliary or control link. Avoid 146.520, the National FM Simplex Calling Frequency, as well as 146.550, which is commonly used by mobiles and RVers.

 

70 CM FM Simplex

446.000*, 445.950, 446.050, 446.100, 446.150 * Use 446.000 as Calling Channel. Always listen first to avoid interfering with another QSO or auxiliary or control link.

 

D-STAR

 

REF033A has been allocated as a full-time JOTA/Radio Scouting D-STAR Reflector. After contact is established, stations should disconnect from REF033A and connect to one or other repeater or migrate to an unused Reflector.

SIMPLEX Channels: 145.670*, 145.640, 145.610, 438.010. * 145.670  and 438.010 are commonly used as the National D-STAR Simplex Channels and should be used only as Calling Channels for JOTA. Always listen first to avoid interfering with another QSO.

 

DMR

 All wide area talkgroups are permitted for use for JOTA for establishing contacts. After contact is established, stations should utilize as few resources as possible. For international, national, and regional QSO’s, stations should move their transmissions to one of the DMR-MARC UA talkgroups or to the DCI TAC-310 talkgroup.

For intrastate contacts, stations may use their area’s statewide talkgroup (if applicable). The use of your repeater’s local talkgroup (if applicable) is always permitted. 

 SIMPLEX Channels: 441.0000*, 446.5000, 446.0750, 433.4500, 145.7900*, 145.5100. All simplex frequencies operate on time-slot 1 and use color code 1. (*are commonly used as the National DMR Simplex Channels and should be used only as Calling Channels for JOTA. Always listen first to avoid interfering with another QSO.) 

 

IRLP

 Use Topic Channel Node 9091 as a Common Meeting Place or Calling Channel. After contact, disconnect from 9091 and one station should connect to another’s local node. 

 

EchoLink

 Software or apps available for Windows, Mac, iPhone/iPad, and Android. Dedicated Conference Node *JOTA-365* (node 480809). When contact is made on a Conference Node, it is recommended the two parties establish direct contact with each other to free up the Conference Node. 

 Publicity 

 You’re encouraged to send news releases of the event to your local newspapers and television and radio stations. You can encourage photographers to attend the event. You can also forward photos to your local news media, including weekly papers. 

JOTA General Guidelines 

 

  • Jamboree-on-the Air is about getting young people to talk to each other using amateur radio.
  • Arrange for the use of a club call sign, or apply for a special-event call sign in plenty of time.
  • Prepare some simple diagrams and explanations showing how radio works and how signals can be transmitted around the world as well as to the nearest repeater.
  • Arrange with the Scout leaders regarding venue, QSL cards, patches, participation certificates, other activities, physical arrangements, publicity, and details required for the JOTA report form on this website.
  • Notify the national JOTA organizer of your event using the details on the registration form on this site.
  • Go to Scout meetings beforehand to introduce the subject.
  • Organize activities such as kit building, soldering practice, SSTV, FSTV, packet radio, and weather satellite reception. The simplest of things, such as a closed-circuit RTTY station, can generate a great deal of excitement.
  • Offer to train Scouts for the Radio merit badge.
  • Offer a Technician license preparation course for those interested in learning and doing more with ham radio.
  • Ensure that no more than three Scouts are watching one Scout on the air. Keep Scouts involved and active or they will quickly grow bored.
  • Ensure that the station is safe for young visitors.
  • Observe your license conditions, especially regarding third-party traffic.
  • Involve the Scouts in the contact. The goal is to involve as many Scouts as possible in making a contact. It is not to maximize the number of contacts or the distance of the contacts; it’s about the experience for the Scouts.
  • Try to use plain, understandable English where possible. When you do use Q-signals and other ham radio terms, take time to explain them to the Scouts.
  • Don’t try to work weak stations from remote locations. Go for stronger, more local stations that unpracticed ears can hear easily and understand. Local FM repeaters can be just as exciting for Scouts.
  • Don’t feel you have to keep the station on the air with no Scouts present.



ABOUT JOTA

 

Jamboree-on-the-Air

Event Details

 Jamboree-on-the-Air, or JOTA, is the largest Scouting event in the world. It is held annually the third full weekend in October. JOTA uses amateur radio to link Scouts and hams around the world, around the nation, and in your own community. This jamboree requires no travel, other than to a nearby amateur radio operator’s ham shack. Many times you can find the hams will come to you by setting up a station at your Scout camporee, at the park down the block, or perhaps at a ham shack already set up at your council’s camp. 

 Scouts of any age can participate, from Cub Scouts to Boy Scouts and Venturers, including girls. Once at the ham radio station, the communication typically involves talking on a microphone and listening on the station speakers. However, many forms of specialized communication may also be taking place, such as video communication, digital communication (much like sending a message on your smartphone but transmitted by radio), or communication through a satellite relay or an earth-based relay (called a repeater). The exchanges include such information as name, location (called QTH in ham speak), Scout rank, age, and hobbies. The stations you’ll be communicating with can be across town, across the country, or even around the world! The World Scout Bureau reported that the 2017 JOTA-JOTI had over 1.5 million Scout participants from more than 160 countries. 

 Jamboree-on-the-Air is held the third weekend in October. There are no official hours, so you have the whole weekend to make JOTA contacts. The event officially starts Friday evening during the JOTA Jump Start and runs through Sunday evening. 

 

Radio merit badge requirements

  1. Explain what radio is. Then discuss the following:a. The differences between broadcast radio and hobby radiob. The differences between broadcasting and two-way communicationsc. Radio call signs and how they are used in broadcast radio and amateur radiod. The phonetic alphabet and how it is used to communicate clearly
  2. Do the following:a. Sketch a diagram showing how radio waves travel locally and around the world.b. Explain how the broadcast radio stations WWV and WWVH can be used to help determine what you will hear when you listen to a shortwave radio.c. Explain the difference between a distant (DX) and a local station.d. Discuss what the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) does and how it is different from the International Telecommunication Union.
  3. Do the following:a. Draw a chart of the electromagnetic spectrum covering 300 kilohertz (kHz) to 3,000 megahertz (MHz).b. Label the MF, HF, VHF, UHF, and microwave portions of the spectrum on your diagram.c. Locate on your chart at least eight radio services such as AM and FM commercial broadcast, citizens band (CB), television, amateur radio (at least four amateur radio bands), and public service (police and fire).
  4. Explain how radio waves carry information. Include in your explanation: transceiver, transmitter, receiver, amplifier, and antenna.
  5. Do the following:a. Explain the differences between a block diagram and a schematic diagram.b. Draw a block diagram for a radio station that includes a transceiver, amplifier, microphone, antenna, and feed line.c. Discuss how information is sent when using amplitude modulation (AM), frequency modulation (FM), continuous wave (CW) Morse Code transmission, single sideband (SSB) transmission, and digital transmission.d. Explain how NOAA Weather Radio (NWR) can alert you to danger.e. Explain how cellular telephones work. Identify their benefits and limitations in an emergency.
  6. Explain the safety precautions for working with radio gear, including the concept of grounding for direct current circuits, power outlets, and antenna systems.
  7. Visit a radio installation (an amateur radio station, broadcast station, or public communications center, for example) approved in advance by your counselor. Discuss what types of equipment you saw in use, how it was used, what types of licenses are required to operate and maintain the equipment, and the purpose of the station.
  8. Find out about three career opportunities in radio. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.
  9. Do ONE of the following: (a OR b OR c OR d)a. Amateur Radio1. Tell why the FCC has an amateur radio service. Describe some of the activities that amateur radio operators can do on the air, once they have earned an amateur radio license.2. Explain differences between the Technician, General, and Extra Class license requirements and privileges. Explain who administers amateur radio exams.3. Explain at least five Q signals or amateur radio terms.4. Explain how you would make an emergency call on voice or Morse code.5. Explain the differences between handheld transceivers and home "base" transceivers. Explain the uses of mobile amateur radio transceivers and amateur radio repeaters.6. Using proper call signs, Q signals, and abbreviations, carry on a 10-minute real or simulated amateur radio contact using voice, Morse code, or digital mode. (Licensed amateur radio operators may substitute five QSL cards as evidence of contacts with five amateur radio operators.) Properly log the real or simulated ham radio contact, and record the signal report.b. Radio Broadcasting1. Discuss with your counselor FCC broadcast regulations. Include power levels, frequencies, and the regulations for low-power stations.2. Prepare a program schedule for radio station "KBSA" of exactly one-half hour, including music, news, commercials, and proper station identification. Record your program on audiotape or in a digital audio format using proper techniques.3. Listen to and properly log 15 broadcast stations Determine the program format and target audience for five of these stations.4. Explain to your counselor at least eight terms used in commercial broadcasting, such as segue, cut, fade, continuity, remote, Emergency Alert System, network, cue, dead air, PSA, and play list.5. Discuss with your counselor alternative radio platforms such as internet streaming, satellite radio, and podcasts.c. Shortwave and Medium-Wave Listening1. Listen across several shortwave bands for four one-hour periods - at least one period during daylight hours and at least one period at night. Log the stations properly and locate them geographically on a map, globe, or web-based mapping service.2. Listen to several medium-wave stations for two one-hour periods, one period during daylight hours and one period at night. Log the stations properly and locate them on a map, globe, or web-based mapping service.3. Compare your daytime and nighttime shortwave logs; note the frequencies on which your selected stations were loudest during each session. Explain the differences in the signal strength from one period to the next.4. Compare your medium-wave broadcast station logs and explain why some distant stations are heard at your location only during the night.5. Demonstrate listening to a radio broadcast using a smartphone/cell phone. Include international broadcasts in your demonstration.d. Amateur Radio Direction Finding1. Describe amateur radio direction finding and explain why direction finding is important as both an activity and in competition.2. Describe what frequencies and equipment are used for ARDF or fox hunting.3. Build a simple directional antenna for either of the two frequencies used in ARDF.4. Participate in a simple fox hunt using your antenna along with a provided receiver.5. Show, on a map, how you located the "fox" using your receiver.


Local Repeaters In East TN

Event Details

There are several repeaters in East TN, Here local In Sevier & Knox County area, you have the WB4GBI Repeater's, which are used frequently for our scouts to get on the air, RACK Club, Smoky Mountain Amateur Radio Club, KD4CWB Repeaters, Clinton ARC, are a few of the repeaters.

Get our young generation involved, Support Our Youth.. For further on JOTA check out the Scouts Websites, there are many .. And again all our welcome to attend our meetings, events,, and get togethers,  Scouts in Uniform with their Leaders also get in Free at our Hamfest in March of each year !!